Demeter 3

It happened on the Plain of Nysa. There it was that the Lord who receives many guests made his lunge.

He was riding on a chariot drawn by immortal horses. The son of Kronos. The one known by many names.

He seized her against her will, put her on his golden chariot,

And drove away as she wept. She cried with a piercing voice,

calling upon her father Zeus, the son of Kronos, the highest and the best.

But not one of the immortal ones, or of human mortals,

heard her voice. Not even the olive trees which bear their splendid harvest.

Except for the daughter of Persaios, the one who keeps in mind the vigor of nature.

She heard it from her cave. She is Hekatê, with the splendid headband.

And the Lord Helios the Sun heard it too, the magnificent son of Hyperion.

They heard the daughter calling upon her father, the son of Kronos.

But he, all by himself was seated far apart from the gods, inside a temple, the precinct of many prayers.

He was receiving beautiful sacrificial rites from mortal humans.

She was being taken, against her will, at the behest of Zeus,

by her father’s brother, the one who makes many monuments, the one who receives many guests,

the son of Kronos, the one with many names. On the chariot drawn by immortal horses.

So long as the earth and the star-filled sky

were still within Persephone’s view, as also the fish-swarming sea with its strong currents,

as also the rays of the sun, she still had hope that she would yet see

her dear mother and that special group, the immortal gods.

For that long a time her great mind was soothed by hope, distressed as she was.

The peaks of mountains resounded, as did the depths of the sea,

with her immortal voice.

[17-39]


One Response to “Demeter 3”

  1. 1 Miranda

    I’m surprised that no one responded with a like to Hymn to Demeter. I thought that is was good, and better than a lot of the works that are floating around under the guise of Classics. Give yourself a pat on the back.


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